Album Review

Waterboys – Good Luck, Seeker: Album Review

Mike Scott’s journey with The Waterboys continues relentlessly as he searches for new ideas and finds a way of pleasing all fans of The Waterboys whatever their musical style preference has been over the years

Released: August 21st 2020

Label: Cooking Vinyl

Format: CD / Vinyl / Digital

Mike Scott’s life has been as varied as the different styles of music he has produced through the vehicle of The Waterboys. In his autobiography, Adventures of A Waterboy, a beautifully written book and a must read for all his fans, he tells us of how even in his early years he saw colours in music. On Good Luck, Seeker, we hear all the different colours from the last forty years of their music.

Fans of The Waterboys will each have their favourite shade of course, and on this album they will meet their favourite colour somewhere along the journey from the big production and the Celtic folk to the dramatic poetry and prose. All these styles are blended together with loving care to produce a stunning collection of musical pieces to savour. If you are ever in a quandary as to which of the many variants you want to listen to when you are in the mood for The Waterboys, this will be your ‘go to’ album because the entire palette is available!

Nobody has done more soul searching either through music or life experiences than Mike Scott so it’s appropriate that the first track pays tribute to The Soul Singer, with its startling brassy opening, describes the traits of ‘the curmudgeonly’, down trodden soul performer. It romps along and brightly lifts you for the treats in-store.

You Got To Kiss A Frog Or Two is like Fairy Story meets love song. Mike Scott narrates and sings the tale of the trials of a young maiden searching for the love of her life. Amusing but true to life. Another change in style throws us back to the ‘Fishermen’s Friend years in Low Down In The Broom.If you prefer the more upbeat Waterboys then a song featuring the renegade film star Dennis Hopper, Freak Street, Sticky Fingers , Why Should I Love You and The Golden Work will be to your liking. Each of these has their own individual elements from synthesised vocals and vocal effects, dancing beat, street sound effects, wailing backing singers, searing guitar solo. All different, all fascinating and interesting.

My Walks in A Weary Land maintains the lively tempo but the lyrics are fervently delivered, a sumptuous lead guitar drives us to the end. In Postcard From A Celtic Dreamtime Mike Scott describes a personal warmly spoken view of a tranquil scene after a vicious storm on the Arran Isles. His captivating lyrical imagery of landscape and characters is utterly compelling. Listening to his eloquent spoken lyrics I’m very much reminded of his autobiography.

The philosophical title track offers words of wisdom, advice and a challenge to those searching for the answers to life’s mysteries and ultimate peace of mind. Before the finale two brief tracks, both coming in at less than 2 minutes each, Beauty in Repetition is a funky instrumental with more spoken philosophical thought and there are more observations from Mike Scott in Everchanging; which of course he is!

The album closes with another alluring monologued epic describing the placid Land of Sunset, which has more folky flavours depicting the chalky landscape of the Mendips.

”Its 14 songs are populated by unrepentant freaks, soul legends, outlaw film stars and 20th Century mystics………part song diary, part epic spoken word adventure.” I have found many of The Waterboys albums requiring a few listens before being accustomed to Mike Scott’s pondering’s and muse but this one I was instantly grabbed by and with each listen I am continuously falling under its spell.

Mike Scott and The Waterboys have recently announced a Patreon subscription, which you can view all the information for, here.

You can view the video for The Soul Singer below, and connect with the band via their social links.

Waterboys: Official Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / Patreon

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