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Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte – This Savaging Disaster: Album Premiere

Exclusive premiere of This Savaging Disaster – the Subsound Records release from Italian doom-jazz legends, Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte . 

Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte continues their journey of sound exploration  with This Savaging Disaster, the thirteenth album in the long history of the Roman band. It comes in two versions LP (8 tracks) and Tape (with 3 bonus tracks). The title is inspired by a James Ellroy quote, in turn, borrowed from WH Auden, “this storm, this savaging disaster.” A brutal act of resignation that looms in times of uncertainty, wars, pandemics, and private hells.

Here’s an exclusive chance to experience the whole record:

Stylistically the album is another step forward for a band that has long developed a distinctive sound that’s anchored between noir jazz, dark ambient and electronic, but with each new release, is able to renew itself and show new nuances. “Dark jazz is just an empty genre that you can fill up with your touch and your own inspiration,” is what marks the members of Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte.

Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte is a post-industrial and dark jazz band formed in 2001, maintained by Adriano Vincenti who’d named the project Clive Barker’s novel The Midnight Meat Train.

Initially designed “with nosy sound collages and not very subtle quotations from the history of film and jazz“, Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte developed the style that was judged to be a more elaborate radio play version of the so-called dark or doom jazz.

The band went from the original sampling collages to recording their music analogously with drums played with brushes, electric bass and guitar, saxophone, grand piano and marimba, releasing such massive murder ballads as Funeral Jazz or ambient pieces driven by jazz echoes on Hiver Noir. This Savaging Disaster can be regarded as a sum
of them all and a step forward at the same time.

According to Lorenzo Macinanti, the group’s music is associated with, but not influenced by, that of Bohren & the Club of Gore, The Kilimanjaro Darkjazz Ensemble and Dale Cooper Quartet & the Dictaphones. In addition to industrial and noise, John Zorn and Miles Davis as well as horror films by Fulci and Cronenberg, among others were formative for the stylistic development. Macinanti also formulated a special connection to the work of Nicolas Winding Refn.

Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte online: Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / Bandcamp

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